Comfortably numb outro solo pedal knowhow

Guitar Tricks Forum > Tone and Effects > Comfortably numb outro solo pedal knowhow

kencarvo

Registered User

Joined: 09/19/19

Posts: 1

Hello GTWorld,

I have been learning the outro solo at home and although am getting quite

good at various sections of this solo, I notice that I am not getting the

right tone at different areas of the rendition.

Am using a Marshall 10CF amp and for pedals I have a CS3, Blues Driver,

Boss DS1, Behringer Reverb DR600, and Behringer VD400 delay.

Have the guitar connected to the CS3, followed by the Boss and then

the Blues Driver followed by the VD400 and the DR600.

My amp is on clean signal and though the tone is quite close to the original

I find that the sustain of the note is not long enough and sometimes when I

do a pull of I dont get the second note ringing out clearly.

Any advice on this would be highly appreciated.

Cheers

Ken

#1

Hello GTWorld,

I have been learning the outro solo at home and although am getting quite

good at various sections of this solo, I notice that I am not getting the

right tone at different areas of the rendition.

Am using a Marshall 10CF amp and for pedals I have a CS3, Blues Driver,

Boss DS1, Behringer Reverb DR600, and Behringer VD400 delay.

Have the guitar connected to the CS3, followed by the Boss and then

the Blues Driver followed by the VD400 and the DR600.

My amp is on clean signal and though the tone is quite close to the original

I find that the sustain of the note is not long enough and sometimes when I

do a pull of I dont get the second note ringing out clearly.

Any advice on this would be highly appreciated.

Cheers

Ken

aschleman

Registered User

Joined: 04/26/05

Posts: 2049

What type of guitar are you using? David Gilmour is obviously using a Strat for this solo. He's also using a Big Muff (triangle or ram's head version) for his distortion. Which has a sustain knob. It's a "fuzz" distortion pedal, but the sustain knob tightens up the fuzz and turns it into a more smooth tone that gets the long smooth effect that Gilmour is using throughout the solos of Comfortably Numb. You can get the re-issue pedals for $99 and maybe cheaper used on Reverb. I actually just replaced my 90's black Russian Muff with a re-issue of the Triangle Muff.

Sustain is a tricky thing, though... It can come from your fingers, the guitar, and the pedals you're pluggin into. So, theres a lot of variables there. I'd strip the pedal chain down to the distortion, delay and reverb and see where that gets you. If you're not getting the sustain, maybe replace your DS-1 with a Muff triangle.

#2

What type of guitar are you using? David Gilmour is obviously using a Strat for this solo. He's also using a Big Muff (triangle or ram's head version) for his distortion. Which has a sustain knob. It's a "fuzz" distortion pedal, but the sustain knob tightens up the fuzz and turns it into a more smooth tone that gets the long smooth effect that Gilmour is using throughout the solos of Comfortably Numb. You can get the re-issue pedals for $99 and maybe cheaper used on Reverb. I actually just replaced my 90's black Russian Muff with a re-issue of the Triangle Muff.

Sustain is a tricky thing, though... It can come from your fingers, the guitar, and the pedals you're pluggin into. So, theres a lot of variables there. I'd strip the pedal chain down to the distortion, delay and reverb and see where that gets you. If you're not getting the sustain, maybe replace your DS-1 with a Muff triangle.

johnboy301

Full Access

Joined: 04/12/20

Posts: 7

Originally Posted by: kencarvo

Hello GTWorld,

I have been learning the outro solo at home and although am getting quite

good at various sections of this solo, I notice that I am not getting the

right tone at different areas of the rendition.

Am using a Marshall 10CF amp and for pedals I have a CS3, Blues Driver,

Boss DS1, Behringer Reverb DR600, and Behringer VD400 delay.

Have the guitar connected to the CS3, followed by the Boss and then

the Blues Driver followed by the VD400 and the DR600.

My amp is on clean signal and though the tone is quite close to the original

I find that the sustain of the note is not long enough and sometimes when I

do a pull of I dont get the second note ringing out clearly.

Any advice on this would be highly appreciated.

Cheers

Ken

As the other poster mentioned, Gilmour used a Big Muff on the solo to Comfortably Numb. He actually used that pedal actually quite extensively throughout his time in Pink Floyd. I believe in conjunction with the Muff he used a boost pedal. This would definitely open up the Big Muff and add more sustain. You could set up your Blues Driver as a boost by turning the gain down and the level up. Another thing that he used was a Leslie rotary speaker. You can get pedals out there that simulate a Leslie speaker, but you could also get similar tones out of a chorus pedal as well. The chorus pedal normally would be less expensive and also be a bit more versatile.

Hope this helps a bit.

#3

Originally Posted by: kencarvo

Hello GTWorld,

I have been learning the outro solo at home and although am getting quite

good at various sections of this solo, I notice that I am not getting the

right tone at different areas of the rendition.

Am using a Marshall 10CF amp and for pedals I have a CS3, Blues Driver,

Boss DS1, Behringer Reverb DR600, and Behringer VD400 delay.

Have the guitar connected to the CS3, followed by the Boss and then

the Blues Driver followed by the VD400 and the DR600.

My amp is on clean signal and though the tone is quite close to the original

I find that the sustain of the note is not long enough and sometimes when I

do a pull of I dont get the second note ringing out clearly.

Any advice on this would be highly appreciated.

Cheers

Ken

As the other poster mentioned, Gilmour used a Big Muff on the solo to Comfortably Numb. He actually used that pedal actually quite extensively throughout his time in Pink Floyd. I believe in conjunction with the Muff he used a boost pedal. This would definitely open up the Big Muff and add more sustain. You could set up your Blues Driver as a boost by turning the gain down and the level up. Another thing that he used was a Leslie rotary speaker. You can get pedals out there that simulate a Leslie speaker, but you could also get similar tones out of a chorus pedal as well. The chorus pedal normally would be less expensive and also be a bit more versatile.

Hope this helps a bit.