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E Major Chord Progression

 

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Speedy Ideas Series 5: Advanced Major Shredding

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In this lesson I discuss the chord progression that will be used in the backing track. It is in the key of E major.

  • E majnor - I chord - 4 measures
  • B7 - V chord - 4 measures
  • E major - I chord - 4 measures
  • F#7 - V of V chord - 2 measures
  • B7 - V chord - 2 measures

    Each chord has a function in this progression.

    The E major functions as the tonic, or "home base", the starting point and the ending goal.

    The B7 is the V chord, it functions as the dominant chord, which means it provides tension that pulls away from the E major tonic chord. It is a place that is far away from home base, so that we have a place to return from.

    The F#7 is the V of the V chord, it is the dominant of the dominant! This is of course more specifically known as the secondary dominant. It functions as another layer of dominant chord, which means it provides even more tension that pulls away from the E major tonic chord. It is a place that is very far away from home base, so that we have to return to the B7, the dominant chord, before we can then return to the E major chord as the eventual goal of the progression.

    The F#7 chord is a modulation. This means that although it is related to the scale, or key of E major, it contains notes that are not strictly in the E major scale. So, we will have to alter the E major scale in order to build licks to play when these chords happen.

    The F#7 chord has a A# as it's major 3rd. Essentially, the F#7 is the V of B major, so we can play notes from the B major scale while the F#7 chord is happening.

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